DDB in New York and the clean-water organization WATERisLIFE already proved a powerhouse pairing with last year’s #FirstWorldProblems campaign, which riffed on the popular hashtag by having poverty-stricken Haitians read aloud tweets like “I hate when my leather seats aren’t heated.” For its follow-up, DDB has set its sights on another country with its own clean-water problem—Kenya, where children have a one in five chance of dying before age 5 often because of unsafe drinking water.

To drive home that reality, DDB is focusing on what young children want to accomplish in their lives. A star of the “Kenya Bucket List” campaign is a 4-year-old Maasai boy named Nkaitole who has never been outside his village—and who also happens to be incredibly adorable. With the help of the Water Is Life team, Nkaitole is taken on a journey to fulfill his bucket list—playing soccer in the national stadium, flying in an airplane, seeing the ocean for the first time. It’s beautifully filmed and absolutely heartbreaking. (In the works: a series of videos featuring American children and their own bucket lists, a campaign being promoted with the hashtag #5YearsToLive.)

“Kenya Bucket List” marks a different direction from DDB’s guilt-inducing #FirstWorldProblems campaign, with its anonymous narrators. Nkaitole’s story puts a name and face to the narrative—and to hopes for the future., I might suggest a good book, perhaps Hemingway or Melville. That’s why they call it, the dummy copy. This, of course, is not the real copy for this entry. Rest assured, the words will expand the concept. With clarity. Conviction. And a little wit.

In today’s competitive market environment, the body copy of your entry must lead the reader through a series of disarmingly simple thoughts.